24 hours along the Causeway Coastal Route- European Heritage Open Days

This weekend is ‘European Heritage Open Days’ where over 300 properties and attractions right across Northern Ireland will open their doors to the public, many for free.

It’s such a great opportunity to explore hidden gems, especially those which are not usually accessible to the public and I always look forward to this weekend each year to try out new places.

I now live in the Glens of Antrim so I was delighted when Discover NI got in contact asking if I would like to explore some of the highlights along the Causeway Coastal Route, making my way along the famous road to experience dramatic landscapes,  quaint villages and vibrant hidden heritage.

Here’s how I spent my 24 hours along the Causeway Coastal Route

Tuesday 4th September- Dobbins Inn

I started my tour 11 miles from Belfast in Carrickfergus, where I spent the evening at the Dobbins Inn. The Inn is situated in the heart of Carrick and has a unique legacy spanning over  800 years. Built in the early 13th Century, the Inn is a listed building with period features including a 16th Century Priest Hole and Elizabethan Fireplace, as well as a resident ghost Maud! (Thankfully I didn’t experience anything ‘spooky’ but, I’m told, she’s well-known to stroke the faces of guests in their sleep!) The owners of the Dobbins Inn are currently exploring the history of the building and are stripping back much of the plaster to see what original stone and brick work lies underneath. Carrickfergus Castle is right across the street so the hotel is a great place for exploring and starting your tour along the Coast.

Wednesday 5th September AM- Whitehead

Once I’d checked out, I made the short distance to the small town of Whitehead, which is known as the “town with no streets” (given that no road there has the suffix street!) The classic Victorian architecture is evident and it’s full of pretty cafes and shops. Of course, I had to go to the Marina to see the famous colourful houses while I was there too! As part of the European Heritage Open Days, Whitehead Art Gallery will be open so visitors can explore the Gallery and go on tours of the Edwardian House.

The Gobbins

After my walk around Whitehead, it was time to head to Islandmagee to visit the world-famous attraction, The Gobbins. The Gobbins is an old Victorian walkway, with the path first opening in 1902. It was abandoned in the 1960s before being relaunched in 2015 and is now enjoyed by thousands of visitors from across the world each year. And I can see why! You’re walking right on the edge of cliffs along a narrow path and into caves below sea level. The views of the coastline and native sea birds are just spectacular. The tour takes about 2.5 hours and explores the history of the area and the path, tales of local smugglers, as well as hearing about the flora and fauna. I can’t recommend it enough.(The Gobbins isn’t a part of European Heritage Open Days but there are some tickets available for this weekend so make it a part of your plans, if you can!)

PM- Glenarm Castle

After my 2.5 tour I jumped back in the car and travelled the furthest distance of the day (about 20 miles) to Glenarm Castle. The Castle is the home of Viscount and Viscountess Dunluce, and is well-known for the Walled Garden, charming Tea Rooms and being home of Glenarm beef and lamb. I met with the Estate Manager Adrian who showed me around the beautiful, colourful gardens before we went to the Tea Rooms for lunch. Of course I had to try the Shorthorn Beef farmed in the estate (I couldn’t resist!) and went for the Shorthorn beef burger with cheese, bacon, crispy onions and tomato and chilli jam. Glenarm is such a lovely venue so stop for lunch on your tour this weekend! (If you’re heading to Glenarm, you can visit the restored Gatelodge, built in 1825, as part of European Heritage Open Days.)

Carnlough

After lunch it was just a short drive to the village of Carnlough, recently increasing in popularity due to it being a film location in Game of Thrones (where Arya Stark jumped into the water after her fight with The Waif.) I had a quick look around the village and the harbour before I meet with local guide Mary Watson at the Heritage Hub. The recently opened Hub exhibition reflects on how Carnlough and the Glens have been shaped by industry, trade and engineering. Mary is full of knowledge about the local area and, as someone who has recently moved to the Glens, I’d love to get back down and explore the Hub in more detail. The Heritage Hub will be open this Saturday and Sunday as part of European Heritage Open Days.

Ballygally Castle

After hearing about the history of the Glens, I headed back down the Coast Road to the village of Ballygally where my last stop of the day was dinner at Ballygally Castle. The Hotel is a unique 17th Century Castle which overlooks Ballygally Bay and is reportedly haunted by a friendly ghost, Lady Isabella (my second haunted hotel in just 24 hours!). Brave guests can even visit the “ghost room” in the tower! I headed up to the haunted room and again, thankfully, didn’t experience anything spooky! It’s such an eerie room though, so I only took a few quick snaps before heading back downstairs! For dinner I availed of the set menu, which is 2 courses and a glass of wine (I had a soft drink as I was driving) for £20.  For mains I had the Chicken Fillet, stuffed and wrapped with Northern Irish Dry Cure Bacon with Gracehill Black Pudding and champ croquettes,  followed by Clandeboye Yoghurt and Honey cheesecake for dessert. As expected the meal was delicious (I’ve eaten in here numerous times and can’t fault it), and I finished the evening with a stroll around the Hotel’s Walled Garden.

I had a brilliant time exploring the Causeway Coastal Route and it was great to hear more about the history and culture of the coastal villages and attractions. Thank you to Discover NI for the fab itinerary. Check out  https://discovernorthernireland.com/globalassets/events/ehod-2018/ehod-booklet-2018-.pdf to see all that you can explore this weekend in Mid and East Antrim and the Causeway Coast and Glens. Some real gems to be discovered!

#DiscoverNI #EYCH2018

Disclaimer: My overnight stay, tickets to The Gobbins, lunch and dinner were complimentary. All other extras, including travel and refreshments were at my own expense.

Advertisements

Cooking masterclass with Rachel Allen

Ballymaloe relish is a staple in our house and it’s now one of those items in the “Did you forget…?” section when I’m ordering online groceries!

I was, therefore, delighted when I got invited to a cooking masterclass with Irish celebrity chef Rachel Allen from Ballymaloe Foods.

Rachel is a famous face in the culinary word and a regular on RTE. She’s all about quick but healthy and tasty family foods, which is definitely how I’ve been cooking lately. So, I couldn’t wait!

The masterclass was at Forestside Cookery School, which is run by chef Stephen Jeffers, which I’ve been to before and is brilliant.

When we arrived I was delighted to see it wasn’t simply a demo but that we would be getting stuck in and getting our hands dirty!

First up, we made brown soda bread/ wheaten bread. I make wheaten bread now and again but this recipe was different- this time using butter, eggs and a mixture of seeds on top of my usual recipe.

Everyone was working in pairs but there must have been an odd number because I ended up having to do it all on my own- which doubled the pressure!

The recipe for the brown soda bread/ wheaten bread is: 

  • 225g whole wheat (wholemeal) flour
  • 225g all-purpose (plain) flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda (bicarbonate of soda)
  • 3 tablespoons (50g) mixed seeds, such as sesame, pumpkin, or sunflower, or golden flax seeds (linseeds) (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons (25g) butter, softened (optional)
  • 1 egg
  • 375–400ml buttermilk or soured milk
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).
  2. Sift together the flours, salt, and baking soda in a large bowl and mix in the seeds (if using). Add the butter (if using), and rub into the flour mixture with your fingertips until it resembles bread crumbs. Make a well in the centre.

  3. In another bowl, whisk the egg with the buttermilk and pour most of the liquid into the flour mixture. Using one hand with your fingers outstretched like a claw, bring the flour and liquid together, adding more of the buttermilk mixture, if necessary. The dough should be quite soft, but not too sticky.

  4. Turn onto a floured work surface and gently bring the dough together into a round about 1 1/2 inches (4cm) thick. Cut a deep cross on top and place on a baking sheet.

  5. Bake for 15 minutes. Turn down the heat to 400°F (200°C) and bake for 30 minutes more. When done, the loaf will sound slightly hollow when tapped on the bottom. Remove from the baking sheet and place on a wire rack to cool.

Once the bread came out of the oven, we topped it with cheese and Ballymaloe relish and it was perfect. I have a loaf home with me so I’ll be eating that over the next few days! 🙂

Next up was a take on the Mexican favourite, quesadillas.  Obviously, cheese is the main ingredient (as the name would suggest), but you can fill the quesadilla with whatever you like! For the purpose of the masterclass, we went for cheese, ham, and the Ballymaloe jalapeño relish to give it a feisty kick.

The recipe for the quesadillas is:

  • 4 x 8cm (7 inch) flour or corn tortillas
  • Salt and pepper
  • 100g Cheddar cheese, grated
  • 100g Bacon or ham, cooked and finely chopped
  • 1-2 tsp chives, chopped
  • 1-2 tsp parsley, chopped
  • Créme Fraiche or Ballymaloe jalapeño Pepper relish
  1. Lay a tortilla in an 18cm/7inch dry pan and place the grated cheese bacon, parsley and chives on it, spreading the filling evenly to within 2cm of the edges
  2. Spread a thin layer of relish over a second tortilla and place, relish side down, on top of the filling
  3. Place the pan on a low heat and fry until the quesadilla is crispy and golden on the outside and the cheese has melted in the middle
  4. Slide the quesadilla onto a chopping board and cut into wedges.

This worked really well and the relish was a lovely addition to the dish. Once we’d finished cooking, Rachel showed us how to make some family favourites, including potato salad with Ballymaloe French dressing, and a chicken and blue cheese salad with Ballymaloe cranberry sauce.

I loved the masterclass and came away inspired. Rachel kindly gifted us her cookbook and some Ballymaloe relishes and sauces, so I’ll be getting to work!

Portglenone Sunflower Field

This week we went to visit an unbelievable sunflower field in Portglenone.

I’d seen a few pictures on social media and couldn’t believe how many sunflowers there were (175,000!) and how tall they were (the tallest reaching 7ft!) I just had to get along while they were still there.

The sunflower display, on the Gortgole Road, is attracting people from all over Northern Ireland, including Niamh and I who traveled 45 minutes from Cushendun and my in-laws who traveled 40 mins from Belfast!

The three acres of sunflowers have flourished due to the very warm weather we experienced between May and July.

Entry is £2 per adult and free for children and all proceeds are going to the family’s local chapel. There’s also an opportunity to buy sunflowers to take home with you.

I talked to the family while I was there and they are due to close the field to the public next week so make sure you get there this weekend if you don’t want to miss it!

This video of Niamh wandering through the sunflowers was picked up by Cool FM’s Facebook and it has already had 46,000 views! My wee superstar!

 

Whitehead Railway Museum

Niamh has recently started taking a interest in trains and in her ‘First Words’ book always points to the train and says “choo choo!”.

So, when I was invited along to the newly opened Whitehead Railway Museum, which would include a ride on a 100-year-old steam train, I thought we should go and see if she would enjoy being on trains, “in real life”, so to speak!

The attraction opened in October 2017 by the Railway Preservation Society of Ireland with the intention of opening up to the public some historical railway items, including and engine from 1879 and a carriage from 1911.

I’m not, by any means, an avid fan of the heritage of railway travel, but I was interested to see what the old trains looked like and the current restoration work being undertaken.

We headed down on Saturday and our first stop at the attraction was the renovated Edwardian tea rooms situated in the Station Building. We had some tea and tasty cake in the period-style cafe while watching the steam train pass by.

Once finished we only had to wait a few minutes before we were ready to board the train ourselves. The 100-year-old steam train is running every 15 minutes between 12-4pm each Saturday this summer. The locomotive is known as the 3BG Guinness as it worked at the Guinness brewery in Dublin. Niamh loved it and was in her element waving at the people on the platform!

After our train ride we then met our tour guide Colin for our hour-long tour around the museum. We heard about the history of the station, visited the Signal Box, and saw a wide range of old trains, engines and carriages (even some that we could hop on and look around.)  There is even a section where children can dress up in Victorian period-style costumes.

Niamh was too young to appreciate the tour so I think it would be better with older children, or those with an interest in trains beyond knowing what a “choo choo” is! But I enjoyed experiencing the steam train and seeing some rail history come to life! Thanks for having us!

Our day at Whitehead Railway Museum- round up video 

Tea Rooms at Whitehead Railway Museum

3BG Guinness

Signal Box

Museum Tour

Where I’ve been

It’s been three months since I last posted a blog. Not because I got bored of doing it, or couldn’t be bothered, or didn’t have the time. It just wasn’t the right time to do one.

So many things have happened over the past few months – my daddy passing away at the end of May being the hardest. I kept the whole thing very private and it didn’t feel right to post pictures of him and say that he had passed away. It’s a private thing.

We also moved permanently to Cushendun and have been moving our lives up there. I still commute to Belfast so my 20 minute journey to work is now 1.5 hours each way, including dropping off Niamh to my mum or my husband’s mum! That’s tiring but coming home to beside the beach is nice! 🙂

Everything has been crazy and I didn’t want to write. But it’s nice to still get out and about and hopefully pick up the blog again. If anything, I’ll write for myself even if no-one wants to read it!

Tour Lough Neagh this summer

If you’re starting to plan your summer holidays, now you can tour Lough Neagh at your leisure with a range of guided tours!

Steeped in history, heritage, folklore, fauna and culture, Lough Neagh provides the backdrop for this unique range of one day tours which depart from Belfast.

  • Lough Neagh Crosskeys Flyer Tour, Co Antrim

Visitors will be transported from Belfast aboard the ‘Crosskeys Flyer’ to enjoy a traditional evening of music and craic in Ireland’s oldest thatched pub and where they can purchase one of the best tasting pints of Guinness in the north. The stone built cottage was once a coaching stop on the route between Belfast and Derry~Londonderry and dates back to 1654.

  • Lough Neagh Shane’s Castle Tour, Co Antrim

More recently acclaimed as a location for Game of Thrones filming, visit the ancient ruins of Shane’s Castle and hear the stories of the family Banshee. Inspect the mysterious black face on the rock which must remain in place to protect the continuation of the O’Neill dynasty. And enjoy indulgent afternoon tea in the old railway café!

  • Lough Neagh Craic ‘n Food & Drink Tour, Co Antrim and Co Londonderry

A sampling of Lough Neagh Eel accompanied by stories from an eel fisherman whose family have been fishing on the Lough since the Flight of the Earls in 1607 starts the tour which ends with toe tapping traditional Irish music in Ireland’s oldest thatched pub – The Crosskeys Inn. There is a visit to Northern Ireland’s only buffalo farm at Ballyriff and a stop off at a pub made famous by much loved local poet, Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney on the Lough Neagh Craic ‘n Food & Drink Tour.

  •  Lough Neagh Wilderness Tour, Co Armagh

For those who wonder what rural life was like before technology took over, this one day tour transports visitors into the wilderness to provide an insight into how the ancestors of Lough Neagh lived and survived! The ultimate adventurer’s day out, Lough Neagh Wilderness Tour offers visitors an opportunity to build a shelter and a chance to canoe on Lough Neagh with only the resident swans for company.

  • Lough Neagh Rams Island Tour, Co Antrim

A short boat journey to Ram’s Island where visitors can explore a round tower from the remains of a 1,000 year old Celtic monastic settlement and the ruins of the O’Neill family’s 19thcentury summer house on this unique Lough Neagh Rams Island Tour.

  •  Lough Neagh Heartland Food & Drink Tour, Co Armagh and Co Tyrone

Foodies will enjoy the first stop on the Lough Neagh Heartland Food & Drink Tour, at award winning Harnett’s Oils. The cold-pressed rapeseed and hemp oils are made from crops grown on the family run farm. At the next stop visitors can sample Long Meadow Cider and take in a tour of the orchard.  At Crannagael House, a grade two listed Georgian house, a delicious buffet showcasing the produce on the tour will be provided. The last stop is at a real gem of a pub in Moy which has been in the Tomney family for 300 years.

To book a place, log on to www.loughneaghtours.com